Songs Reviews Session essay

Frank Sinatra – “You Make Me Fell So Young”: Frank Sinatra’s “You Make Me Feel So Young” is a piece of popular music at first place. More specifically, it is a mixture of Sweet Jazz, popular music, and classical music. The instrumentation of the song and its sounding indicate a variety of instruments being involved. The song is composed in keeping with a typical verse-chorus pattern. Timber and melody of solos are in the middle register.  The emphasis in the song is placed upon the horns section. The sounding of trumpets, drums, clarinets, flutes, and xylophone is discernible in the song. All through its playtime, the song remains upbeat. Its tempo and power of sound raise in the chorus and as the closing part of the song begins. The song begins with horns’ section introducing the main theme and the rhythmical pattern that set the tone of the song. The vocal part follows, accompanied mainly by clarinets and drums. There some slight variations of the song’s main theme and rhythmical pattern. The songs’ middle part is characterized by more vivid sounding of trumpets. The song’s ending is rather abrupt. The song might have been recorded in the studio or performed at a concert that could take place at a restaurant somewhere in the United States in the late nineteen-fortieths or the early nineteen-fiftieths. Apparently, the song was composed in order to entertain people and to make their pastime more enjoyable.

Glenn Miller – “In the Mood”: Glenn Miller’s “In the Mood” is, basically, reputed one of the most famous compositions of Glenn Miller’s. “In the Mood” is associated with another song, “Chattanooga Choo Choo”. The later was featured in the film Sun Valley Serenade, a film starring Glenn Miller’s orchestra. “In the Mood” positions itself as a mixture of swing, classical, and a bit of popular music. The song is an instrumental piece. Versatile sounding, characteristic of swing, implies that a whole jazz orchestra is performing a song. “In the Mood” is an upbeat instrumental piece. The melody is fluctuating between the solos of different sections of instruments. Horns and the rhythm section in the song complement each other harmoniously. The horns’ section, represented by trumpets, trombones, saxophones, and clarinets, introduces the main theme and the key rhythmical patterns, which sets the tone of the whole song. The song’s introductory/expository part is followed by a saxophone solo. The rhythm section, in its turn, is represented by drums, double bass, and keyboards, serves to support the horns’ section and to modify the main theme. There are some abrupt pauses in the song, after which different instruments of a rhythm section in succession introduce a modified rhythmical and melodic pattern. Timber and melody of solos are in the middle and upper register. Solo gives an opportunity to each section’s instruments to express themselves. The main theme is developed and varied throughout the song. The song was composed approximately in the late nineteen-thirtieth or the early nineteen-fortieths. The song was composed to be performed by an orchestra in concert-halls, restaurants, or ballrooms while receiving gests. The song was composed mainly for the purposes of self-expression, and, on the other hand, to entertain the audience.

 

Billie Holiday – “Strange Fruit”: Billie Holiday is reputed one of the most outstanding female jazz vocalists ever. The song is a mixture of blues and popular music. In this particular piece, the composer artistically reconsiders the format of a song as such. The emphasis in the song is placed upon the vocal part. Voice and keyboards are the elements of the rhythmical group that manifest themselves in the song most vividly. The tempo of the song is moderate. The song begins with a short piano intro. Voice and piano make a harmonious unity and accompany each other on through the song. “Strange Fruit” is slightly monotone yet emotively and emotionally expressive piece. Billie Holiday’s vocal skills and performance technique were unequaled. Billie Holiday’s creative manner, her life’s work, was intimately related to her personal life and her character features as such. The song was composed, recorded, and performed for the first time approximately in the late nineteen-fortieths. The song could have been performed in restaurants, ballrooms, or simply it could have been a part of jazz concert program. The song was presumably composed for the purposes of self-expression.

Artie Shaw – “Nightmare”: Artie Shaw’s “Nightmare” is a mixture of jazz and classical music. The song’s orchestration is versatile, which means that variety of instruments is employed. The song is an instrumental piece. The song is composed in minor case. Timber and melody of solos are in the lower and middle register. The horns’ section in this particular song is represented by trumpets, trombones, saxophones, and clarinets. The rhythm section, in its turn, is represented by drums and bass. The main theme is developed and varied steadily. The song begins with the both sections’ introduction of a rhythmical pattern that sets the tone to the whole song. The introductory part is followed by the horns’ section solo. The song itself is built on short variations of the main theme. The song ends with retardation and decline in the power of sound. The depth of sound is another distinctive feature of this particular song. The song was composed approximately in the late nineteen-thirtieths to be performed by an orchestra in concert-halls or restaurants. The song was created to amuse the audience and as a means of composer’s self-expression.

Syncopated rhythm, improvisation, and the elements of stride pianism are the qualities peculiar to Benny Goodman’s “Frankie and Johnny”. Ragtime, stride pianism, and classicism are the genres one can discern in the song. The song is an instrumental piece. The melody is developing steadily in reaches its peak in the song’s closing part. Keyboard’s and brass instruments’ parts are the nucleus of the song. Particularly, the horns’ section in this particular song is represented by trumpets, trombones, saxophones, and clarinets. The rhythm section, in its turn, is represented by drums and keyboards. The song begins with a short rhythm’s section passage, followed by the horns’ section introduction of a main theme and a rhythmical pattern that set the tone to the whole song. The middle part of the song is a saxophone solo, followed by the trombones’ solo, after which clarinets and trumpets come in. The song ends with a bright and broad major chord. Benny Goodman himself was a very successful musician. Reasons for Goodman’s success as a musician were pure talent and the fact that Benny Goodman cooperated with some of the most talented musicians and arrangers of that time. Goodman’s ambition, with regard to this, was to keep abreast of the latest musical tendencies. Benny Goodman was capable of orienting himself in musical tastes and preferences of the audience. “Frankie and Johnny” was composed approximately in the middle or the late nineteen-fortieths to be performed by an orchestra in concert-halls or restaurants. The song was created to amuse the audience and as a means of composer’s self-expression.

Duke Ellington and Mercer Ellington – “Satin Doll”: Syncopated rhythmical patterns and sophisticated melodic lines proved themselves to be the distinctive features of Duke Ellington’s creative manner. “Satin Doll” is an instrumental piece. It combines the elements of swing, classical, and popular music. The song’s instrumentation/orchestration is characterized by a wide tonal range. The melodic lines are fluctuating between the middle and upper register. Brass instruments, namely, trumpets, trombones, saxophones, and clarinets, introduce the main theme. Keyboards and drums complement the melodic line and contributed to the development of the main theme. The song begins with the short rhythm section’s intro, after which the horns’ section comes in and introduces the main theme and the rhythmical that set the tone to the whole song. The introductory part is followed by a piano solo, accompanied by the drums’ section. Saxophones’ solo is another significant part of the song. It is followed by the horns’ section repetition of the main theme, which is, basically, the code of the song. The song was composed approximately in the nineteen-fiftieths. The song was created to amuse the audience and as a means of composer’s self-expression.

Duke Ellington’s “On a Turquoise Cloud” is a mixture of jazz and classical music. The piece contains a vocal part that constitutes one of the song’s most significant elements. The piece resembles a classical exercise in vocalization. The song abounds with the so-called grace-notes. The sounding of flutes, clarinets, and trombones is discernible. The rhythm section, on the other hand, is represented by key-boards and string section at first place. The melody is fluctuating between lower and middle register. The vocal part, on the other hand, is composed to be performed in the middle and upper register. The melody is monotonous yet it is developing steadily harmoniously, even though the instruments’ sounding in the upper register and vocalist’s high tessitura discord at a certain point. The song begins with a piano introducing the main theme, followed by the vocal part. The vocal part is followed by the clarinets’ solo. Vocal part continues to set the tone of the song. The power of sound decreases by the ends of the song, the rhythm retardates, a piano chord ends the song. The song was composed approximately in the middle of the nineteen-fortieths presumably to be performed in a restaurant, a concert-hall, or as a part of concert program. The song illustrates Duke Ellington’s tendency towards sophistication in music. The song was created to amuse the audience and as a means of composer’s self-expression.

“Come Sunday” is on a list of the musical album Black, Brown and Beige, by Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Deep and rich sounding is the distinctive feature of the piece. The piece is a mixture of classical music and jazz. The song is an instrumental piece. The melodic lines of key-boards and viola are woven harmoniously into the canvas of the song. These particular instruments add color to the song’s emotional palette. At the same time, clarinets, trombones, and trumpets create the main theme and thus, render the main tonal qualities of the song. The melody of the song is fluctuating between the lower and middle registers. The song begins with a piano introducing the main theme the rhythmical pattern that set the tone of the song. A short introduction is followed by a viola solo, accompanied by piano. The song reaches its peak when the drums and the horns’ section set it. The song ends with a violin solo, accompanied by the horns’ section. The song was composed between the nineteen-fortieths and the nineteen-fiftieths. One can assume with utter surety assume that the song plays an important role within the album itself. The song is characterized by a great deal of emotional expressiveness from the technical perspectives. The song was created to amuse the audience and as a means of composer’s self-expression.

Billie Holiday “Nice Work If You Can Get It” is a mixture of swing and popular music. The song also contains some elements of stride pianism in its introductory part. The song is composed in major scale. Emphasis is placed on the key-boards, drums, and vocal part. The song’s nature is merely entertaining. The development of melodic lines is based on the principle of repetitions and variations. Sophistication of the rhythmical patterns stands opposed to the relative simplicity and harmoniousness of the melodic lines. Falsetto vocal part and ragged, syncopated rhythm of rhythm section make a harmonious whole and thus, they are the distinctive feature of this particular song. The song was composed approximately in the late nineteen-thirtieths or the late nineteen-fortieths. The song is slightly different from the vast majority of works performed by Billie Holiday as she is reputed a blues female vocalist. However, Billie Holiday’s singing complements the instrumental part quite harmoniously. Apparently, the song might have been included on a list of a jazz concert’s program. The song was created to amuse the audience and as a means of composer’s self-expression.

“Cotton Tail” performed by Ella Fitzgerald is the pure expression of jazz fusion. Ella Fitzgerald is known for her cooperation with George and Ira Gershwin. Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holiday to these days remain one of the most renowned female vocalists whose contribution to jazz and blues music has become unparalleled. “Cotton Tail” highlights experimentation, improvisation, and talent as the main qualities of a jazz-musician, be it a performer or a composer is playing his own work himself. The song is sample of upbeat music. It is an experimental piece, composed for a vocalist and a jazz ensemble. The song is a mixture of jazz, classical, and popular music. The emphasis is placed upon saxophone, key-boards, and drums. The instruments performing solos are saxophone, violin, and guitar. Solos are in the song’s middle part, after a lively introductory part setting the tone of the song. The melody is developing mainly in the middle register. The melody abounds with grace-notes. The song ends with a more vivid variation of the main theme on the horns section’s part. The song was composed approximately in the nineteen-fortieths or the early nineteen-fiftieths. The nature of the song is merely entertaining, which implies that song was composed for the audience’s relaxation and for the sake of the musicians’ self-expression.

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Songs Reviews Session essay

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